Faculty Bios
Chairperson

Lecia V. Sequist, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Mary B. Saltonstall Endowed Chair in Oncology
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston


Dr. Lecia V. Sequist is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chair of the Clinical Trials Committee for Thoracic Oncology at the DF/Harvard Cancer Center, and a Thoracic Medical Oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

She leads clinical and translational research efforts through grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense, and private foundations, and directs a busy practice caring for patients with lung cancer. Her research focuses on studying novel targets for lung cancer treatment, especially in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and other driver oncogenes. Dr. Sequist also studies the changes that occur in cancers at the time of acquired drug resistance and the significance and use of liquid biopsies. Her aim is to develop treatment algorithms for lung cancer that are more personalized than current strategies, using targeted therapies specific to the patients’ cancer genotypes, and understanding how this may change over the course of the disease.

Dr. Sequist earned an MD degree from Harvard Medical School and a Masters in Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health. She completed a residency in internal medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and a fellowship in hematology/oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, both in Boston.

Faculty Presenter

Davie S. Ettinger, MD
Alex Grass Professor of Oncology
Professor of Medicine
Professor of Otolaryngology-Head
Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Professor of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland


Dr. David S. Ettinger is the Alex Grass Professor of Oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland. He is also a Professor of Medicine, Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Gynecology and Obstetrics, and Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences.

Dr. Ettinger’s research interests are in new drug development and innovative multidisciplinary treatment strategies in lung cancer and sarcomas. He is also interested in improving supportive care measures associated with cancer and its treatment. Dr. Ettinger has been the author or co-author of more than 200 articles and serves as an editor for Current Treatment Options in Oncology. He has edited 3 books: Thoracic Oncology, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001; Current Cancer Therapeutics, 5th Edition, Springer, 2009; and Supportive Care in Cancer Therapy, Humana Press, 2009. Dr. Ettinger is a member of the board of directors of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) as well as a member of the NCCN guidelines steering committee. In addition, he has been chairman of the NCCN non–small cell lung cancer practice guidelines panel, antiemetic practice guidelines panel, and occult primary tumor practice guidelines panel.

Dr. Ettinger earned an MD degree from the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He completed a medical internship and residency at the Albany Medical Center and Mayo Clinic, respectively. He completed his training in medical oncology at Johns Hopkins.

Faculty Presenter

Shirish M. Gadgeel, MD
Professor of Oncology and Internal Medicine
Director of the Thoracic Oncology Program
Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute
Wayne State University School of Medicine
Detroit, Michigan


Dr. Shirish M. Gadgeel is a Professor of Oncology and Internal Medicine and Director or the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute at Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit. He is the leader of the thoracic oncology team at Karmanos Cancer Institute and a member of the phase 1 team.

Dr. Gadgeel has conducted and participated in many lung cancer–specific trials and in phase 1 trials and is engaged in many epidemiologic studies in the field of lung cancer, writing about features of lung cancer in black patients and in young patients. He is currently the Principal Investigator (PI) of multi-PI R21 to identify driver genetic alterations in black patients with lung cancer. Dr. Gadgeel is also the Co-Leader of the Molecular Therapeutics Program of the Core Cancer Center Grant of KCI and the site PI for the NO1 grant awarded to the California Cancer Consortium.

Dr. Gadgeel is a member of the early therapeutics committee and lung cancer committee of the Southwest Oncology Group. Dr. Gadgeel is a member of the ethics committee of the International Association of Study of Lung Cancer. He is a member of the editorial board of Clinical Lung Cancer and Cancer and a reviewer for many journals including Clinical Cancer Research, Lancet Oncology, and Journal of Thoracic Oncology.

Dr. Gadgeel earned an MD degree from Grant Medical College, Bombay, India. He completed an internal medicine internship at LaGuardia Hospital in Forest Hills, New York, and an internal medicine residency at Wayne State University, where he also completed a fellowship in bone marrow transplantation.

Faculty Presenter

Sarah B. Goldberg, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Yale University School of Medicine
Yale Cancer Center
New Haven, Connecticut


Dr. Sarah Goldberg is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the section of Medical Oncology at the Yale School of Medicine and Yale Cancer Center. At Yale, she takes care of patients in the thoracic oncology group and conducts clinical and translational research on lung cancer.

The focus of her research is investigating biomarkers and novel treatment strategies in non–small cell lung cancer. Specifically, her work includes studying targeted therapy and immunotherapy, with a particular interest in patients with brain metastases.

Dr. Goldberg earned an MD degree from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and a Masters of Public Health from Harvard University. She completed an internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital followed by a medical oncology fellowship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Faculty Presenter

David H. Harpole, Jr., MD
Professor of Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery
Vice Chair of Research, Department of Surgery
Associate Professor of Pathology, Department of Pathology
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, North Carolina


Dr. David H. Harpole, Jr. is a Professor of Surgery in the Division of Thoracic Surgery at the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, where he serves as Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Surgery and directs the Lung Cancer Biorepository. In addition, Dr. Harpole is an Associate Professor of Pathology in the Department of Pathology at the Duke University Medical Center.

Dr. Harpole has contributed numerous articles (>175) and abstracts to the medical literature. His work on non–small cell lung cancer and esophageal carcinoma has appeared in the Journal of Thoracic & Cardiovascular Surgery, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Journal of Thoracic Oncology, Cancer, and Lung Cancer. His work has also been presented at the national meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Association for Cancer Research, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. 

Dr. Harpole earned an MD degree from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia and completed his internship, residency, and fellowship in general surgery and thoracic surgery at Duke University Medical Center.

Faculty Presenter

Joel W. Neal, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)
Stanford Cancer Institute at Stanford University
Palo Alto, California


Dr. Joel W. Neal is currently an Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford Cancer Institute at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California.

Dr Neal’s primary clinical interest is thoracic oncology; in addition to patient care, he focuses on the design and conduct of clinical trials involving targeted therapies for lung cancer. He is an active member of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Dr. Neal earned an MD degree and a PhD degree in tumor cell biology from the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. He completed a fellowship in oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center in Boston, Massachusetts.

Faculty Presenter

Zofia Piotrowska, MD, MHS
Instructor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Assistant in Medicine, Hematology/Oncology
Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center
Boston


Dr. Zofia Piotrowska is an Attending Thoracic Medical Oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Instructor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

She has a busy clinical practice caring for patients with lung cancer and leads clinical and translational research efforts aimed at developing novel targeted therapies for lung cancer. Dr. Piotrowska’s research focuses on cancers with mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor and other driver oncogenes. She is interested in understanding mechanisms of acquired resistance to novel targeted agents, developing new treatments to overcome resistance, and incorporating liquid biopsies into current research paradigms and clinical practice. She has received National Institutes of Health and private foundation grant support for these efforts.

Dr. Piotrowska earned an MD degree and a Master of Health Science degree from the Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticutt. She completed a residency in internal medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and a fellowship in hematology/oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, both in Boston.

Faculty Presenter

Maureen F. Zakowski, MD
Thoracic Pathologist and Cytologist
Department of Pathology
Mt. Sinai Hospital
New York, New York

Maureen F. Zakowski, MD, is a Thoracic Pathologist and Cytopathologist at Mt Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Dr. Zakowski has been instrumental in setting up systems for reflex testing of lung cancer for targetable mutations. She works closely with oncologists, surgeons, and interventional radiologists to help achieve the best possible outcomes for patients with lung cancer. Dr. Zakowski has written or co-written more than 150 papers and taught and presented at the national and international level. She serves on multiple editorial boards of pathology journals.  

Dr. Zakowski earned an MD degree from Ross University School of Medicine in Roseau, Dominica. She completed a residency in pathology (combined anatomic and clinical pathology) at the Hartford Hospital in Connecticut, where was the Chief Resident in anatomic pathology. She completed a fellowship in surgical pathology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.